Manoj Mate is Associate Professor of Law and Director of the Center for International and Comparative Law at Whittier Law School, and Professor (by courtesy) of Political Science at Whittier College. Mate’s scholarly expertise centers on law in India and South Asia and Indian politics, comparative public law, law and development, and the study of political and environmental regulation from an interdisciplinary perspective. Professor Mate’s teaching interests include international law, comparative legal systems, constitutional law, and election law.

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Professor Mate is completing a book-length manuscript on judicial activism and assertiveness in the Supreme Court of India that examines how elite institutional factors, including professional and intellectual elite opinion and the media, shape and influence judicial decision making. His current research projects focus on electoral reform, corruption, and participation in the United States and India, economic liberalization and development in India and Turkey, processes of constitutional entrenchment in comparative perspective, and environmental regulation in India.

His publications include book chapters in edited volumes on comparative law and law in Asia published in Oxford University Press and Cambridge University Press, and articles in Columbia Human Rights Law Review, Berkeley Journal of International Law, and Boston University International Law Journal. Mate’s forthcoming and recent scholarship includes: The Rise of Judicial Governance in India, forthcoming, Boston University International Law Journal, (2015), and Elite Institutionalism and Judicial Assertiveness: Fundamental Rights and the Supreme Court of India, forthcoming Temple Journal of International and Comparative Law (2014) (invited submission, presented at panel “Constitutional Conflict and Development: Perspectives from South Asia and Africa,” Annual Meeting of the Association of American Law School, 2014.

Professor Mate currently serves on the Executive Board and as Treasurer of the Section on Law and South Asian Studies of the American Association of Law Schools, and is a founding member of the Southern California Law and Social Science Forum, which brings together scholars from the Los Angeles and Southern California area to share and discuss their research in American, Comparative, and International Law with fellow scholars, graduate students, undergraduates, and the broader intellectual community where the forum is held.

Professor Mate previously served as a Fellow in Comparative Law at Berkeley Law School, and as a Mellon-Sawyer Research Fellow at the Center for the Study of Law and Society at Berkeley. Mate was the recipient of numerous fellowships including the Mellon-Sawyer Doctoral Fellowship at the Center for the Study of Law and Society, Berkeley Law School, a Ford Foundation Visiting Fellowship, and a Department Fellowship in Political Science at Berkeley. Mate received his J.D. from Harvard Law School, and his Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of California, Berkeley. Mate received his B.A. in Political Science (with highest honors) from the University of California, Berkeley, and was awarded the Departmental Citation in Political Science, awarded to the top student in the graduating class.

Selected Presentations

Rethinking The Participatory Model, presented at the Second Annual Meeting of the Southern California Law and Social Science Forum, Whittier Law School, March 28, 2014.

Elite Institutionalism and Judicial Power in India, presented at panel on “Constitutional Conflict and Development: Perspectives from South Asia and Africa,” Annual Meeting of the Association of American Law School, New York, NY 2014.

Economic Liberalization, Development, and the Supreme Court of India, presented at the Sixth Annual South Asia Legal Studies Pre-Conference, University of Wisconsin Law School, Madison, WI, October 17, 2013, and the Class Crits VI Conference, Southwestern Law School, Los Angeles, CA, November 2013.

High Courts and Electoral Reform in India and the U.S., presented at the 2013 Annual Meeting of the Law and Society Association, Boston, MA, May 2013.

The Evolution of Judicial Power in the Supreme Courts of India and Pakistan, presented at the
2013 Annual Meeting of the American Political Science Association, Chicago, IL, August 2013

The Judicial Response to Electoral Reform in the U.S. and Indian Supreme Courts, presented at the 2013 Annual Meeting of the Western Political Science Association, Hollywood, California, March 2013.

Public Interest Litigation and the Expansion of Judicial Power in India, presented at the 2012 Annual Meeting of the Law and Society Association, Honolulu, Hawaii, June 2012.

The Expansion of the Power of the Supreme Court of India in Governance, presented at the 2011 Annual Meeting of the Law and Society Association, San Francisco, California, June 2011.

Learning from the Mistakes of the Prevention of Terrorism Act (POTA): The Mumbai Terror Attacks and the Future of Anti-terrorist Law in India, presented at the 2009 Annual Meeting of the Law and Society Association, Denver, Colorado, May 2009.

Priests in the Temple of Justice: Judicial Independence, the Basic Structure Doctrine and the Legal Complex in India, presented at the 2009 Annual Meeting of the Law and Society Association, Denver, Colorado, May 2009.

Rights, Governance, and the Expansion of Judicial Power in India, presented at Indian Democracy: Justice & the Law, FDRI/Berkeley Seminar on Indian Democracy, co-sponsored by the Center for South Asia Studies, University of California, Berkeley and the Foundation for Democratic Reforms in India, September 26-27, 2008.


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